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The CDA Institute is pleased to post relevant news, articles, and commentaries on security and defence related issues from the past week. Also look for additional material in our Security & Defence Briefings.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

rsz 2rcmi conferenceThe CDA Institute is pleased to bring to your attention the C4ISR and Beyond event, designed to bring to the forefront the emerging technologies that are coming into play to meet the demanding needs and challenges of Canada. This event will be held on 20 April 2016 at the Fairmont Château Laurier. Register today.

We are pleased to release the conference summary from the CDA and CDA Institute 2016 Ottawa Conference on Security and Defence.

The CDA’s Associated Member Association, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, is holding the Security Studies Conference “Are We Prepared? Emergency Preparedness in the 21st Century,” on 27 April 2016. Click here for more information.

CDA INSTITUTE BLOG: THE FORUM

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy: An Assessment: CDA Institute guest contributor Tom Ring, a Senior Fellow at uOttawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, comments on some of the challenges facing the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

Thinking About Strategic Posture Options: Dutch lessons for Canada?: CDA Institute guest contributor Srdjan Vucetic, an associate professor at the University of Ottawa, looks at what lessons Canada could learn from the Netherlands as it proceeds with its defence policy review.

Russia’s Syrian Intervention: A temporary reprieve won with a heavy political sacrifice: CDA Institute Research Fellow Richard Shimooka looks at Russia’s intervention in Syria and the long-term prospects facing the al-Assad régime.

Between Traitors and Politicians: Pakistan military’s internal battlefronts – Part 2: CDA Institute Security & Defence Blogger Adnan Qaiser, a political and defence analyst with a distinguished career in the armed forces and international diplomacy, examines Pakistan’s civil-military mistrust in its historical context.

MEDIA ROUNDUP

Liberals launch review to reshape military in face of new threats (Globe and Mail): Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan announced a year-long defence policy review, alongside a four-person panel of experts to advice him on the review. This advisory panel includes the Honourable Louise Arbour, the Honourable Bill Graham, General Raymond R. Henault (Retired) – who is also immediate past President of the CDA Institute – and Margaret Purdy.

Longtime soldier says military pushed him out due to his mental illness (CBC News): The Canadian military has discharged a soldier suffering from severe depression without a medical release, which means he is not eligible for long-term disability support, re-education, retraining, or other benefits.

Tens of millions in severance paid yearly to military members who leave voluntarily (Embassy News): In the last three years, more than $105 million in severance has been paid out to 7,213 Canadians who voluntarily left the military, according to the defence department—and that doesn’t include a massive backlog from the most recent financial year.

Harjit Sajjan defends Canada’s military budget after Donald Trump slams NATO ‘free riders’ (National Post): Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan has defended Canada for bringing up the rear in terms of military spending among NATO members, after US Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump and a number of U.S. senators recently slammed the alliance for being full of “free riders.”

Le Canada et l’UE négocient activement pour éviter l’imposition de visas (Le Devoir) : Un litige entre le Canada et l’Union européenne (UE) pourrait mener éventuellement à l’imposition de visas pour les Canadiens qui souhaitent se rendre dans 26 pays européens. Pour éviter cet écueil, les deux parties devront conclure une entente avant mardi prochain.

Northerners prepare for largest cruise ship in Northwest Passage (Herald News): The Crystal Serenity, which is planning to transit the Northwest Passage, is so large that Canadian officials are holding special meetings this week to prepare. Residents in the communities along its route, who will be outnumbered by the ship’s passengers and crew, are already planning for a visit that won’t happen until August.

Vimy Ridge centennial will be ‘something special’: A defining moment in Canadian history (National Post): With the one-year countdown to the 100th anniversary of Vimy Ridge now begun, Vimy Foundation director Jeremy Diamond is aiming to increase awareness about the battle’s importance across the country.

Premier tir d’essai de missiles surface-surface de la Marine Royale canadienne (45e Nord) : Le NCSM Vancouver est entré dans l’histoire dernièrement en devenant la première frégate canadienne modernisée à effectuer avec succès des tirs d’essai de missiles surface-surface, de type Harpoon Block II, sur des cibles situées à terre.

Security on military bases to be reviewed by all-party Commons committee (Metro News): The House of Commons defence committee will hold closed-door hearings on the state of security at Canadian military bases. Conservative MP James Bezan, the party’s defence critic, proposed the idea, which was recently accepted by the all-party committee, although a date for the investigation has yet to be scheduled.

Liberals launch review to reshape military in face of new threats (Globe and Mail): Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan has embarked on a year-long review of Canada’s Armed Forces to determine how they can be retooled to confront new global threats.

Sajjan shies away from endorsing controversial 2011 Leslie Report (The Chronicle Herald): With a new defence review, the Liberal government seems to be moving away from their campaign commitment to implementing the comprehensive 2011 Leslie Report on Transformation. Sajjan would not say point blank whether this means axing the initial plan to implement the report’s 43 recommendations.

La Garde côtière manquerait de moyens et de soutien politique, selon un rapport (98,5 FM) : La Garde côtière manque cruellement d’effectifs et de nouveaux navires, mais aussi de soutien politique, indique un rapport préparé pour Transports Canada et discrètement déposé à la Chambre des Communes.

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