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The CDA Institute is pleased to post relevant news, articles, and commentaries on security and defence related issues from the past week. Also look for additional material in our Security & Defence Briefings.

ANNOUNCEMENTSRoundtable ad 2

The CDA Institute is pleased to announce a roundtable event with Dr. Tim Goddard, Professor of Education at the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI). Join us for an event discussing Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan, reflecting on conflict, development, and education. 

CDA INSTITUTE BLOG: THE FORUM

Boosting UN Peace Operations: Proceed with caution: David McDonough, CDA Institute Research Manager and Senior Editor, recently published an article in The Embassy commenting on the government’s promise to renew Canada’s role in UN peace operations. We are pleased to have permission to repost the article on our Blog: The Forum.

Australia’s Defence White Paper: What’s in it for Canada: CDA Institute guest contributor John Blaxland, senior fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University, looks at the lessons Australia’s Defence White Paper for Canada.

Vimy Ridge: A Legacy for the Canadian Armed Forces: CDA Institute Research Fellow Richard Shimooka explores what Canada’s experience at Vimy Ridge can tell us about its future military role. 

The search for stability in Eastern Europe: Policy options for Canada: Andrew Rasiulis, a Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Instite, recently published an opinion piece on the search for stability in Eastern Europe in The Embassy, based on a longer CGAI research paperWe are pleased to have permission to repost the piece on our Blog: The Forum. 

From Strategic Buffer to Strategic Liability: China’s North Korea DilemmaCDA Institute Security & Defence Blogger Adam MacDonald, an independent scholar on Canadian foreign policy and Asia-Pacific security, comments on China’s relationship with North Korea. 

MEDIA ROUNDUP

Canadian, U.S. troops share knowledge at Arctic military operation (CBC News): Operation Nunalivut 2016 is currently underway in Canada’s Arctic. In Resolute, Nunavut, more than 230 Canadian Armed Forces personnel are working to improve their survival and patrolling skills. U.S. troops are also contributing to the operation. Both sides are sharing knowledge about Arctic military operations.

Stéphane Dion approves export permits for $11B in LAVs to be sent to Saudi Arabia (CBC News): Minister of Foreign Affairs Stéphane Dion approved the sale of $11-billion worth of Light Armed Vehicles (LAVs) to Saudi Arabia, with the total deal worth $15-billion. The government has faced criticism due to the alleged human rights violations by the Kingdom; however, the Liberals assure that this sale is not linked to any abuses.

Documents shed a little light on what spy Jeffrey Delisle sold to Russians (CBC News): The CBC has obtained “heavily redacted” documents illuminating information sold to the Russians by former naval officer Jeffrey Delisle. The information in the documents, which were “secret,” are related to routine threat assessments generated by Canadian and American naval intelligence authorities.

RCMP refugee screening a $16M flop, says internal report (CBC News): An internal report from the RCMP has found that a $16-million program aimed at keeping dangerous persons out of Canada “turned out to be an expensive security flop.” According to the report, the program was not timely, operated out of the RCMP’s mandate, and, overall, did not effectively screen refugees who might be involved in illegal activities overseas. 

Chances of Brussels-style ISIL attack less likely in Canada, Senate committee told (National Post): A senate committee was told by the Integrated Threat Assessment Centre (ITAC) that the chances of a Brussels-style ISIL attack in Canada is unlikely. Retired Major-General Rousseau, the centre’s executive director, notes the lack of evidence that ISIL has support networks in Canada – unlike in Europe.

Matthew Fisher: Suitability for Arctic defence, lower cost may put F-35s on Liberals’ radar (National Post): Matthew Fisher reports that the F-35 might again be on the government’s agenda due to the jet’s continuously-decreasing price and suitability for Arctic missions. Once estimated at $145-million per unit, the price per unit is expected to drop to $80-million by 2019.

Liberals reopen debate 11 years after Martin government opted not to join U.S. ballistic missle defence (National Post): Eleven years ago the Martin government decided not to join the ‘contentious’ ballistic missile program initiated by the United States. Now, the new government – under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau – have begun to re-examine Canada’s position, citing a complex security environment and enduring threats. 

Canadian company helps train German Air Force (United Press International): A Canadian company – Discovery Air Defence Services – is helping the German Air Force in air combat training. The company, which claims to have the largest private fleet of combat planes in the world, utilized two A-4N Skyhaws.

Operation Nunalivut 2016 is currently underway in Canada’s Arctic. In Resolute, Nunavut, more than 230 Canadian Armed Forces personnel are working to improve their survival and patrolling skills. U.S. troops are also contributing to the operation. Both sides are sharing knowledge about Arctic military operations.

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